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‘Like it’s been nuked’: Millions of bees dead after SC sprays for Zika mosquitoes

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On Sunday morning, the South Carolina honey bees began to die in massive numbers.

(WP) Death came suddenly to Dorchester County, S.C. Stressed insects tried to flee their nests, only to surrender in little clumps at hive entrances. The dead worker bees littering the farms suggested that colony collapse disorder was not the culprit — in that odd phenomenon, workers vanish as though raptured, leaving a living queen and young bees behind.



Instead, the dead heaps signaled the killer was less mysterious, but no less devastating. The pattern matched acute pesticide poisoning. By one estimate, at a single apiary — Flowertown Bee Farm and Supply, in Summerville — 46 hives died on the spot, totaling about 2.5 million bees.

Walking through the farm, one Summerville woman wrote on Facebook, was “like visiting a cemetery, pure sadness.”

A Clemson University scientist collected soil samples from Flowertown on Tuesday, according to WCBD-TV, to further investigate the cause of death. But to the bee farmers, the reason is already clear. Their bees had been poisoned by Dorchester’s own insecticide efforts, casualties in the war on disease-carrying mosquitoes.

On Sunday morning, parts of Dorchester County were sprayed with Naled, a common insecticide that kills mosquitoes on contact. The United States began using Naled in 1959, according to the Environmental Protection Agency, which notes that the chemical dissipates so quickly it is not a hazard to people. That said, human exposure to Naled during spraying “should not occur.”

In parts of South Carolina, trucks trailing pesticide clouds are not an unusual sight, thanks to a mosquito-control program that also includes destroying larvae. Given the current concerns of West Nile virus and Zika — there are several dozen cases of travel-related Zika in South Carolina, though the state health department reports no one has yet acquired the disease from a local mosquito bite — Dorchester decided to try something different Sunday.



It marked a departure from Dorchester County’s usual ground-based efforts. For the first time, an airplane dispensed Naled in a fine mist, raining insect death from above between 6:30 a.m. and 8:30 a.m. Sunday. The county says it provided plenty of warning, spreading word about the pesticide plane via a newspaper announcement Friday and a Facebook post Saturday.

Local beekeepers felt differently.

“Had I known, I would have been camping on the steps doing whatever I had to do screaming, ‘No you can’t do this,’” beekeeper Juanita Stanley said in an interview with Charleston’s WCSC-TV. Stanley told the Charleston Post and Courier that the bees are her income, but she is more devastated by the loss of the bees than her honey.

The county acknowledged the bee deaths Tuesday. “Dorchester County is aware that some beekeepers in the area that was sprayed on Sunday lost their beehives,” Jason Ward, county administrator, said in a news release. He added, according to the Charleston Post and Courier, “I am not pleased that so many bees were killed.”



Spraying Naled from the air is not unprecedented, particularly when covering areas that cannot be reached by truck. In a single year in Florida, more than 6 million acres were fumigated with the chemical, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The agency argued in January that the technique should be used to curb Zika in Puerto Rico.

But the insect neurotoxin cannot discriminate between honey bees and bloodsuckers. A profile of the chemical in Cornell University’s pesticide database warned that “Naled is highly toxic to bees.”

Although the insecticide was known to kill bees, to South Carolina beekeepers spraying had not been as significant a concern as parasites, disease and other hive threats. As South Carolina Beekeepers Association President Larry Haigh told the Post and Courier in June 2015, many counties will spray at night, when honey bees do not forage for pollen. Plus, given sufficient warning, beekeepers will shield their hives and protect the bees’ food and water from contamination.

Sunday was different. Summerville resident Andrew Macke, who keeps bees as a hobby, wrote on Facebook that the hot weather left bees particularly exposed. Once temperatures exceed 90 degrees, bees may exit the nest to cool down in what is called a beard, clustering on the outside of the hive in a ball. Neither Macke nor Stanley had covered their hives.

And then came the plane.

“They passed right over the trees three times,” Stanley said to ABC 4 News. After the plane left, the familiar buzzing stopped. The silence in its wake was like a morgue, she said.

As for the dead bees, as Stanley told the AP, her farm “looks like it’s been nuked.”

A Summerville resident started a Change.org petition calling for Dorchester County to halt aerial Naled spraying. It is unclear whether those who lost bees are pursuing other recourse.

The FBI Distributes Child Pornography to Catch People Who Look at It

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By its own logic, the government victimized children thousands of times.




(HIT & RUN) As part of a recent child pornography investigation disconcertingly known as Operation Pacifier, the FBI ran a website that distributed photographs and videos of sexual abuse. Last year, the Seattle Times reports, “after arresting the North Carolina administrator of The Playpen, a ‘dark web’ child-pornography internet bulletin board, agents seized the site’s server and moved it to an FBI warehouse in Virginia.” The FBI used the website to run “a sting and computer-hacking operation of unparalleled scope that has thus far led to criminal charges against 186 people,” mostly for receiving or possessing child pornography. In other words, the FBI became a major distributor of child pornography to catch people who look at it, thereby committing a more serious crime than the people it arrested.



Operation Pacifier is reminiscent of reverse drug stings in which cops pose as dealers to catch retail buyers, except that in this case the FBI actually disseminated contraband. It did not merely pose as a distributor of child pornography; it was a distributor of child pornography. During the two weeks the FBI was running The Playpen, about 100,000 people visited the site, accessing at least 48,000 photos, 200 videos, and 13,000 links. In fact, the FBI seems to have made The Playpen a lot more popular by making it faster and more accessible. The FBI’s version attracted some 50,000 visitors per week, up from 11,000 before the government takeover.

As attorneys representing the people busted by the FBI have pointed out, those actions are deeply problematic in light of the government’s position that children are revictimized every time images of their sexual abuse are viewed or transferred. That argument is one of the main rationales for punishing mere possession of child pornography, which under federal law and the laws of some states can be treated more harshly than violent crimes—more harshly even than actual abuse of children. That penalty structure is obviously irrational unless you believe that serious harm is inflicted every time someone looks at the image of a child’s sexual abuse. In that case, a large enough collection of images could equal or even surpass the harm done by a single child rape, so that it could make sense to impose a life sentence on someone who has done nothing but look at pictures.


Yeah, I don’t buy that either. But federal prosecutors supposedly do, and here they are bringing cases that, by their own lights, required the FBI to victimize children thousands of times. Each time the FBI “distributed” an image, it committed a federal crime that is punishable by a mandatory minimum sentence of five years and a maximum sentence of 20 years. So did the person who “received” the image, which in the Internet context is the same as looking at it. If such actions merit criminal punishment because they are inherently harmful, there is no logical reason why the agents who ran The Playpen should escape the penalties they want to impose on the people who visited the site.

In a 2002 New York University Law Review article, Howard Anglin argued that victims of child pornographers have legal grounds to sue FBI agents who mail images of them to targets of undercover investigations. “If, as courts have held, the children depicted in child pornography are victimized anew each time it changes hands, this practice inflicts further injuries on the children portrayed in the images,” Anglin wrote. “The practice of distributing child pornography in undercover operations exposes federal agents to potential civil liability and undermines the integrity of the criminal justice system.”

Officer of the Year Arrested for Domestic Abuse

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YORK, Pa. (AP) – A central Pennsylvania county’s “Police Officer of the Year” has been charged with assaulting his wife.



The York Dispatch reports 34-year-old Bryn Lindenmuth was charged with simple assault, false imprisonment and harassment for allegedly ripping off some of his wife’s clothes, scratching her and refusing to let her leave her home after she returned from a cookout Saturday night. West Manchester Township police say she was able to run to a neighbor’s and call 911.

Lindenmuth has been placed on paid leave by the Southwestern Regional Police, who patrol several of York’s suburbs. His defense attorney didn’t immediately return a call for comment Wednesday.

Lindenmuth was named York County’s officer of the year in 2015 for making 16 DUI arrests, filing 45 criminal charges and conducting 350 traffic stops.

After Bryn Lindenmuth was arrested, Kalina Lindenmuth said she was “sick and tired” of being physically abused and pushed around by her husband, saying this type of violence had happened many times before, documents state.



She said she was afraid to call authorities because her husband is a police officer, according to charging documents.

The incident: Kalina Lindenmuth returned home from a cookout about 10:45 p.m. Saturday, and was parked near her home. Bryn Lindenmuth drove by in his Jeep, got out, unlocked his wife’s car with spare keys and took her keys out of her car, according to documents.

Bryn Lindenmuth then yelled at Kalina Lindenmuth before heading off in his Jeep, documents state. Kalina Lindenmuth walked back to her home, where police say she found her husband throwing beer bottles on the front lawn.

When she went into the house, her husband continued to yell at her, taking her phone and looking through it, police said. Bryn Lindenmuth then allegedly ripped her tank top, ripped off her bra, scratched her and allegedly tore apart her sandals, documents state. He also allegedly ripped up photos of them together, police said.

Kalina Lindenmuth then sat on a recliner while Bryn Lindenmuth used her phone to call her sister, telling the sister to mind her own business and calling both women “pieces of sh—t,” according to police.

Police say Bryn Lindenmuth pushed over the recliner with his wife still in it and that when she tried to walk away, he blocked her and pushed her, then tried to throw her through the rear sliding-glass door.

Bryn Lindenmuth allegedly hoisted Kalina Lindenmuth over his shoulder, but she managed to get away and ran to get her phone. Bryn Lindenmuth got the phone first and put it in his pocket, police said, then picked her up again, trying to force her outside.

“Bryn used substantial force using his elbow and jammed it down hard on her shoulder in an attempt to knock her down,” documents state.



He then tried to lock Kalina Lindenmuth in the garage, telling her she could sleep there before turning off the lights, documents state. After that, Bryn Lindenmuth allegedly came into the garage, telling his wife they were leaving, and he tried to force her into the passenger seat of a vehicle.

Kalina Lindenmuth tried to get back into the home to get her phone and wallet, but “Bryn kept blocking her path and grabbed her arms and started to force her backward to possibly fall down the steps,” documents state.

Kalina Lindenmuth was able to grab her flip-flops and run to a neighbor’s home, where she used their phone to call 911, police said. The entirety of the incident lasted from about 11 p.m. until 3 a.m., according to police.

While speaking with police, Kalina Lindenmuth said she was scared of what her husband might do after she called police, adding that he has many weapons in the house, documents state. The couple’s two children were not present during the incident, police said.

The responding officer conferred with the York County District Attorney’s Office before filing the charges, police said, and Kalina Lindenmuth was taken to a local district judge’s office to obtain an emergency protection-from-abuse order.

Investigation: Southwestern Regional Police Chief Greg Bean confirmed Tuesday that Bryn Lindenmuth was placed on paid leave immediately after the alleged incident. Bean said Lindenmuth will remain on paid leave until an internal investigation is complete.

An investigator within the department will be assigned to speak with those involved to determine if there has been any violation of orders. That will then be presented to the police board, which will make a decision about any disciplinary action, he said.

“We don’t want any stone unturned, as far as the facts of the situation, and we present the information as we know it, and a determination is made at that point,” Bean said.

The department will be working closely with the York County District Attorney’s Office and West Manchester Township Police during the investigation, he said.

Accolades: Bryn Lindenmuth was named 2015 York County Officer of the Year in May by the York County Police Heritage Museum.

He has been with the department for 11 years, according to a news release announcing the award. During that time he has received 21 awards or commendations. In 2015, he made 16 DUI arrests, filed 45 criminal charges and conducted 350 traffic enforcement stops, the release states.

“From the perspective of a police officer, he’s always excelled at whatever he does,” Bean said.

Bryn Lindenmuth also is a drug recognition expert and a member of the York County Drug Task Force as a liaison for the department, according to the release.

Lindenmuth could not be reached for comment Wednesday and remains free on $25,000 unsecured bail, meaning he didn’t have to post any money but could lose that amount if he fails to attend court proceedings.

Defense attorney Chris Ferro did not return a message seeking comment on Wednesday afternoon.

HT to GT for reporting on the story

Justice Dept.: “Half of Sexual Abuse Claims in American Prisons Involve Guards”

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Allegations of sex abuse across the country’s prisons are on the rise, with nearly half of cases allegedly being perpetrated by guards, according to a new study conducted by the Justice Department.



(GS) The new Bureau of Justice Statistics report documented more than 8,763 allegations of prisoner sexual victimization between 2009 and 2011, which they say is an 11 percent increase over the number of allegations documented in a report covering 2007-08.

The study found 49 percent of the unwanted sexual misconduct or harassment involved prison staff as perpetrators, in acts ranging from verbal sexual harassment to the most serious nonconsensual sexual penetration.

Allen Beck, a Justice Department statistician and the study’s co-author told ABC News the increased reporting may not necessarily a reflection of an actual increase in the incidence of sexual victimization, but could in part be attributed to the Prison Rape Elimination Act (2003), which is being implemented across the country after final regulations for the act were issued in May 2012.



“It’s reasonable to believe that some of the increase may be related to the greater attention being paid to the issues as well as the better recording and reporting procedures to us,” Beck said.

The Act forces prisons to comply with standards geared toward reducing the incidence of rape and sexual victimization, a key component being the provision of multiple channels for inmates to report abuse, including the option to contact an outside entity. Facilities will also be audited for compliance with the legislation.

Previously, finding the appropriate channels to report abuse could be considered more daunting for inmates, especially if they had to be made intra-institutionally to someone working within the prison’s chain of command.

Bradley W. Brockmann, executive director of The Center for Prisoner Health and Human Rights at Brown University told ABC News that although the study showed there was a rise in the number of reports of sexual abuse, those cases represented a minute fraction of the “extraordinary sexual victimization that goes on daily.”

“The biggest challenge here is that prisons are closed doors,” said Brockmann, who is also a civil rights attorney. “What happens behind those walls generally stays behind them. For somebody to speak out takes immense courage.”

Brockmann said that often when prisoners do speak out, they fear retaliation from the correctional officers.

“Ultimately unless there are witnesses — which is rare — it’s going to come down to the word of the prisoner versus officer,” he said.

This aligns with the study’s findings, which revealed that only 10 percent of sexual abuse claims were investigated and substantiated by officials, the rest being dismissed as “unfounded” or “unsubstantiated.”

Of those substantiated cases, 84 percent of female staff-on-inmate sexual contact “appeared to be willing,” compared with 37 percent of cases allegedly perpetrated by male staff, despite clear laws prohibiting any form of sexual contact between inmates and staff.

Brockmann, attributes some of those numbers to “the extraordinary vulnerability of particularly female prisoners, a disproportionate number of whom have also been victims of sexual, emotional physical abuse since childhood.

“It doesn’t take a lot of coercion to result in what might appear to be consensual act, even though no sex behind bars between staff and inmate can be consensual,” he said.

Of the fewer cases in which the sexual abuse claims against correctional officers were found to be substantiated, more than three-quarters of those officers were fired or resigned, while 45 percent were referred for prosecution and only 1 percent were actually convicted of a crime.



The survey did not break down figures between inmates of different sexual orientations, although Beck said that previous surveys on non-heterosexual and gender nonconforming inmates had revealed much higher rates of sexual victimization.

The study comes the same week as reports of a Justice Department investigation into allegations of rampant sexual abuse at Alabama’s Tutwiler Prison, where inmates were said to “universally fear for their safety” and officers allegedly forced women to engage in sex acts just to obtain basic sanitary supplies.

Brockmann said that shedding light upon and reducing sexual abuse and harassment in prisons like these remains a challenge across the country.

“We know there are hundreds of thousands of more cases out there,” he said.

“That slight increase in reporting I hope is a harbinger of things to come, that there are more individuals who feel safe or more mechanisms to report abuse and avoid retaliation.

“What will make a difference is when we see a few tens of thousands of cases reported,” he said. “That will show something.”

The reports, Sexual Victimization Reported by Adult Correctional Authorities, 2009?11 (NCJ 243904), and Survey of Sexual Violence in Adult Correctional Facilities, 2009?11 – Statistical Tables (NCJ 244227), were written by Allen J. Beck, Ramona R. Rantala and Jessica Rexroat of BJS.

The reports, related documents and additional information about BJS’s statistical publications and programs can be found on the BJS website.

What Could Go Wrong? Homeland Security Wants to Take Over Elections

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Citing national security concerns, the Department of Homeland Security is making an aggressive play to take charge of elections.



(DC) “We should carefully consider whether our election system, our election process, is critical infrastructure like the financial sector, like the power grid,” said Homeland Security Sec. Jeh Johnson (pictured above, far left) at a conference in August.

“There’s a vital national interest in our election process, so I do think we need to consider whether it should be considered by my department and others critical infrastructure,” he explained, underscoring that the problem is the lack of federal control: “There’s no one federal election system. There are some 9,000 jurisdictions involved in the election process,” he said.



The security risks have come under increased scrutiny in recent days after the FBI revealed that two state election boards were victims of cyber attacks, a report that’s giving DHS more ammunition to take control of the election process.

On August 18, the FBI issued a bulletin to all private-industry partners involved in the election process about potential hacking attempts, encouraging them to tighten their security protocols. “The FBI is requesting that states contact their Board of Elections and determine if any similar activity … has been detected,” the FBI’s cyber division stated in a bulletin, explaining that an “unknown actor scanned a state’s Board of Election website for vulnerabilities” and successfully conducted “data exfiltration.” Hackers also used the same vulnerability in another state’s Board of Election system, the FBI explained.



The Washington Examiner notes that Homeland Security’s description of its “critical infrastructure” mandate on its website offers a rationale for the federal takeover of elections.

“There are 16 critical infrastructure sectors whose assets, systems, and networks, whether physical or virtual, are considered so vital to the United States that their incapacitation or destruction would have a debilitating effect on security, national economic security, national public health or safety, or any combination thereof,” explains DHS. According to White House policy, the federal government must “strengthen the security and resilience of its own critical infrastructure,” oversee “the continuity of national essential functions,” and “organize itself to partner effectively with and add value to the security and resilience efforts of critical infrastructure owners and operators.”

In other words, get ready for some federal “oversight” of national elections. What could go wrong?

Hacker ‘Guccifer’ who revealed Clinton’s private email server gets 4+ years in jail

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The Romanian hacker “Guccifer,” who exposed Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server, was sentenced to 52 months by a US federal judge in Virginia. The near-maximum sentence under US law is meant as a deterrent to future hackers, the judge said.



(RT) Marcel Lazar Lehel, 44, a former taxi driver and paint salesman, was arrested in Romania and charged with hacking. He was extradited to the US in 2014.

In May this year, he pleaded guilty to one count each of aggravated identity theft and unauthorized access to a protected computer, admitting to hacking almost 100 Americans over a 14-month period.

“This epidemic must stop,” said US District Judge James Cacheris on Thursday as he meted out a 52-month sentence to Lehel in his Alexandria, Virginia courthouse. A tough penalty would deter future hackers, the judge said.



The sentence is just shy of the 54-month maximum penalty under US sentencing guidelines, which the federal prosecutors requested in the case. “The extent of the harm caused by defendant’s conduct is incalculable,” they argued. The hacker’s lawyers had asked for three years.

“This epidemic must stop,” said US District Judge James Cacheris on Thursday as he meted out a 52-month sentence to Lehel in his Alexandria, Virginia courthouse. A tough penalty would deter future hackers, the judge said.

The sentence is just shy of the 54-month maximum penalty under US sentencing guidelines, which the federal prosecutors requested in the case. “The extent of the harm caused by defendant’s conduct is incalculable,” they argued. The hacker’s lawyers had asked for three years.



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$6.5 TRILLION REMAIN UNACCOUNTED FOR BY U.S. ARMY

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6.5 Trillion dollars remain unaccounted for by the US Army. That’s 30 percent of the entire nations GDP gone.
That works out to $18,571 for every man,woman, and child in the United States.

(REUTERS) The United States Army’s finances are so jumbled it had to make trillions of dollars of improper accounting adjustments to create an illusion that its books are balanced.

The Defense Department’s Inspector General, in a June report, said the Army made $2.8 trillion in wrongful adjustments to accounting entries in one quarter alone in 2015, and $6.5 trillion for the year. Yet the Army lacked receipts and invoices to support those numbers or simply made them up.

As a result, the Army’s financial statements for 2015 were “materially misstated,” the report concluded. The “forced” adjustments rendered the statements useless because “DoD and Army managers could not rely on the data in their accounting systems when making management and resource decisions.”



Disclosure of the Army’s manipulation of numbers is the latest example of the severe accounting problems plaguing the Defense Department for decades.

The report affirms a 2013 Reuters series revealing how the Defense Department falsified accounting on a large scale as it scrambled to close its books. As a result, there has been no way to know how the Defense Department – far and away the biggest chunk of Congress’ annual budget – spends the public’s money.

The new report focused on the Army’s General Fund, the bigger of its two main accounts, with assets of $282.6 billion in 2015. The Army lost or didn’t keep required data, and much of the data it had was inaccurate, the IG said.

“Where is the money going? Nobody knows,” said Franklin Spinney, a retired military analyst for the Pentagon and critic of Defense Department planning.

The significance of the accounting problem goes beyond mere concern for balancing books, Spinney said. Both presidential candidates have called for increasing defense spending amid current global tension.




An accurate accounting could reveal deeper problems in how the Defense Department spends its money. Its 2016 budget is $573 billion, more than half of the annual budget appropriated by Congress.

The Army account’s errors will likely carry consequences for the entire Defense Department.

Congress set a September 30, 2017 deadline for the department to be prepared to undergo an audit. The Army accounting problems raise doubts about whether it can meet the deadline – a black mark for Defense, as every other federal agency undergoes an audit annually.

For years, the Inspector General – the Defense Department’s official auditor – has inserted a disclaimer on all military annual reports. The accounting is so unreliable that “the basic financial statements may have undetected misstatements that are both material and pervasive.”

In an e-mailed statement, a spokesman said the Army “remains committed to asserting audit readiness” by the deadline and is taking steps to root out the problems.

The spokesman downplayed the significance of the improper changes, which he said net out to $62.4 billion. “Though there is a high number of adjustments, we believe the financial statement information is more accurate than implied in this report,” he said.



Jack Armstrong, a former Defense Inspector General official in charge of auditing the Army General Fund, said the same type of unjustified changes to Army financial statements already were being made when he retired in 2010.

The Army issues two types of reports – a budget report and a financial one. The budget one was completed first. Armstrong said he believes fudged numbers were inserted into the financial report to make the numbers match.

“They don’t know what the heck the balances should be,” Armstrong said.

Some employees of the Defense Finance and Accounting Services (DFAS), which handles a wide range of Defense Department accounting services, referred sardonically to preparation of the Army’s year-end statements as “the grand plug,” Armstrong said. “Plug” is accounting jargon for inserting made-up numbers.

At first glance adjustments totaling trillions may seem impossible. The amounts dwarf the Defense Department’s entire budget. Making changes to one account also require making changes to multiple levels of sub-accounts, however. That created a domino effect where, essentially, falsifications kept falling down the line. In many instances this daisy-chain was repeated multiple times for the same accounting item.

The IG report also blamed DFAS, saying it too made unjustified changes to numbers. For example, two DFAS computer systems showed different values of supplies for missiles and ammunition, the report noted – but rather than solving the disparity, DFAS personnel inserted a false “correction” to make the numbers match.

DFAS also could not make accurate year-end Army financial statements because more than 16,000 financial data files had vanished from its computer system. Faulty computer programming and employees’ inability to detect the flaw were at fault, the IG said.

DFAS is studying the report “and has no comment at this time,” a spokesman said.

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WATCH: Clinton Cash – What Hillary Doesn’t Want You To Know

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Clinton Cash, is a feature documentary based on the Peter Schweizer book that the New York Times hailed as “The most anticipated and feared book of a presidential cycle.”

Clinton Cash investigates how Bill and Hillary Clinton went from being “dead broke” after leaving the White House to amassing a net worth of over $150 million, with over $2 billion in donations to their foundation. This wealth was accumulated during Mrs. Clinton’s tenure as US Secretary of State through lucrative speaking fees and contracts paid for by foreign companies and Clinton Foundation donors.



 


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BREAKING: Hillary Clinton Hires Disgraced DNC Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz

Four ways Hillary Clinton Wants to End Gun Ownership as President

Democrats Want Missles for Terrorists, But No Guns for Americans

BREAKING: Hillary Clinton Hires Disgraced DNC Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz

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In one of the most horrendously transparent acts in Hillary Clinton’s corrupt campaign, she has now hired soon-to-be-former DNC Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz. DWS will resign from her position effective at the conclusion of the Democratic National Convention. It was revealed that the DNC was effectively working to sabotage Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) during the Democratic primary, prompting calls for her to resign.



Clinton emailed supporters and said that Schultz would join the campaign as “honorary chair” of the 50-state program to ensure Democrats win elections nationwide. Wasserman Schultz will continue to serve as a Clinton surrogate.



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