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Fountain Valley Girl Asked to Get $3,500 Permit, License for Lemonade Stand

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Just to prove that government regulation always hurts small businesses, the fountain valley regulatory committee has just forced a child to to pay $3,500 in license and permit fees to to run a lemonade stand.



(KTLA5)A Fountain Valley girl who has had some success with a gourmet lemonade stand has been asked by health officials to get a license and a permit for her small business

The paperwork, along with upgrading to a commercial stand, will cost about $3,500 and Anabelle Lockwood’s family has set up aGoFundMe page to help with the expenses.

Anabelle started selling “The Loco Lemon” in June after her father built the stand for her 10th birthday, according to the GoFundMe page. The drink comes in classic or pink, but also includes gourmet flavors like peach, blueberry ginger and watermelon.



“I always wanted to have a lemonade stand. All my friends were talking about it and I thought it was a good idea,” Anabelle told KTLA.

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She tried selling the lemonade at her townhouse complex, but she got a letter from the homeowner’s association saying the stand was a “safety hazard.”

After relocating to different spots, her lemonade sold out every day, according to the page.

As her popularity grew, she also drew some unwanted attention. Orange County health officials have agreed to issue a permit, but on the conditions that she upgrade her cart to get it up to commercial standards, gets liability insurance, a business license, a deposit and an hourly or monthly fee for use.

“This isn’t just another business venture… it’s becoming a life lesson for a young ambitious entrepreneur,” the GoFundMe page says. “She will be able to do so much more in the community as well as at charity and school events to help others. She’s extremely passionate about her business, and we are so proud of her for creating something that so many others can enjoy.”



Anabelle and her family were given 30 days to get the proper documents to run the stand full-scale.

In the meantime, they have had to turn down a wedding, corporate events, movies in the park and church events until they get the proper paperwork.

They are still allowed to sell in residential neighborhoods and inside private homes.

For more information or to donate, visit the Loco Lemon Facebook and Instagram pages.

South Park Creators Endorse Gary Johnson & Call Trump + Hillary “Giant Douche and Turd Sandwich”

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South Park creators Matt Stone and Trey Parker are out promoting season 20. In an interview with the Daily Beast, they made it clear that this season would have some political themes, and that personally, neither of them like the mainstream candidates.




(RA) Last season, they turned one of their characters, Mr. Garrison, into a Trump-like persona. Ironically, they were hesitant to take on Trump because they thought he’d be out of the race in short order. “We thought we’d better do this before it goes away,” Parker said.

The episode featuring Mr. Garrison as Trump ended pretty epically and might be hard to come back from. Mr. Garrison ran for president promising to banish “dirty Canadians,” but ended up getting raped in the final episode. They “didn’t really want to service Trump as a character,” Parker said.




As for Hillary Clinton, their last episode about her was in 2007 and had to do with a “Snuke.” Google it — I’d blush to explain what that is. The creators said they’re going to focus more on Trump. “In this election, Garrison is our character.”

When asked their actual thoughts on the candidates, Parker called Trump and Clinton “the giant douche and the turd sandwich.”

He said if Gary Johnson had “any chance in hell” of winning, he’d likely support him. They both said, “we believe in liberty.”


Four ways Hillary Clinton Wants to End Gun Ownership as President

Hillary Clinton’s Most Cringe Inducing Moments

This Animated Data Visualization of World War 2 Fatalities Is Horrifying

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War is the health of the State.

The video begins by counting the number of deaths during Word War 2. But by 14:18, it shows how truly blessed we are today. And by 16:35, I’m hopeful for our future…








“Who Is He To Confront Me?” – Philippines President Tirade Against “Son Of A Bitch” Barack Obama

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What was an embarrassing weekend for president Barack Obama, whose arrival at the G-20 summit in China was a case study in diplomatic humiliation, just turned even worse when on Monday, Philippine president Rodrigo Duterte warned the US president not to question him about extrajudicial killings, or “son of a bitch I will swear at you” when the two presidents meet at a summit in Laos in the coming days.


The topic of Duterte’s killing spree, supposedly involving mostly criminals and drug-traffickers, without due process has raised eyebrows most recently by the United Nations, which urged the Philippines to stop executing and killing people linked to drug business and threatened that “state actors” could be punished. As a result, two weeks ago Duterte lashed out at the UN and threatened that the country could leave the UN. “Maybe we’ll just have to decide to separate from the United Nations. If you’re that rude, son of a bitch, we’ll just leave you,” Duterte told reporters in Davao, quoted by Bloomberg. “I don’t give a shit about them,” he added. “They are the ones interfering. You do not just go out and give a shitting statement against a country.”



 

Fast forward to today when the outspoken president lobbed a preemptive warning at Obama, and before flying to Laos where the two heads of state are set to meet, said that he is a leader of a sovereign country and is answerable only to the Filipino people. He was answering a reporter’s question about how he intends to explain the extrajudicial killings to Obama. More than 2,000 suspected drug pushers and users have been killed since Duterte launched a war on drugs after taking office on June 30.

In his typical foul-mouthed style, Duterte was quoted by AP as responding: “Who does he think he is?  I am no American puppet. I am the president of a sovereign country and I am not answerable to anyone except the Filipino people, nobody but nobody. You must be respectful. Do not just throw questions. Son of a bitch I will swear at you in that forum,” he said.



Duterte went on to blame the US for causing the unrest on the southern Philippines Island of Mindanao. “As a matter of fact, we inherited this problem from the United States,” he said. “Why? Because they invaded this country and made us their subjugated people. Everybody has a terrible record of extra-judicial killing. Why make an issue about fighting crime?” He added: “Look at the human rights of America along that line. The way they treat the migrants there.”

Duterte has earlier cursed the pope and U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon.

Aware of the firestorm his question would provoke from his less than diplomatic peer, it wasn’t clear whether Obama plans to raise the issue of extrajudicial killings with Duterte during a meeting on the sidelines of the summit of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations.

“Who is he to confront me?” Duterte said, adding that the Philippines had not received an apology for misdeeds committed during the U.S. colonization of the Philippines. He pointed to the killing of Muslim Moros more than a century ago during a U.S. pacification campaign in the southern Philippines, blaming the wounds of the past as “the reason why (the south) continues to boil” with separatist insurgencies. Duterte then once again pointed to human rights problems in the United States.

Last week, Duterte said he was ready to defend his bloody crackdown on illegal drugs, which has sparked concern from the U.S. and other countries. The president also said he would demand that Obama allow him to first explain the context of his crackdown before engaging the U.S. president in a discussion of the deaths.

In response, Obama suggested Monday his planned meeting with Duterte may not go forward. “I always want to make sure if I’m having a meeting that it’s productive and we’re getting something done,” Obama said during his news conference.

“If and when we have a meeting, this is something that is going to be brought up,” Obama said, referring to the Philippines’ controversial record of combating drug crime since Duterte took office earlier this year.

Obama has been attending a meeting of the Group of 20 nations in Hangzhou, China, where his infamous snub by China made global headlines over the weekend. It appears he may have hed enough snubs for one trip.

THIS ARTICLE ORIGINALLY APPEARED ON ZERO HEDGE 

Markets Are Breaking Down India’s Caste System, Turning Untouchables into Millionaires

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This year marks the 25th anniversary of liberal reforms in India that led to the dismantling of many socialist economic policies and the end of the draconian License Raj. Liberalization has changed life for many in India over the past couple of decades, although much more remains to be done. Just the middle class alone has exploded from 30 million people in 1991 to 300 million in 2014.



So this is a good occasion to tell the story of perhaps the most unexpected beneficiaries of these reforms: the rising Dalit millionaires. In recent years, many thousands of so-called “untouchables,” or Dalits, members of the lowest group in the Indian caste order, have risen out of poverty to become wealthy business owners, some even millionaires.

By taking advantage of the greater economic opportunity brought about by market reforms, these Dalit entrepreneurs provide us with an important example of the power of markets, not just to bring about economic emancipation, but to fight deeply entrenched social discrimination.

The Plight of the Dalits

The Indian caste system is an ancient and complex social order that divides society into groups based on a somewhat rough division of labor. The Dalits belong to the lowest group, below the four-tiered hierarchy of priests, warriors, merchants and artisans. Traditionally, Dalits were relegated to a life of doing “dirty” jobs such as cleaning floors and toilets or handling garbage: hence gaining the name “untouchable” as others would refuse to come into contact with them.


The state effectively made all production decisions and awarded licenses to a few chosen oligarchs.

Since one’s caste was determined by birth, and it was impossible to switch castes throughout one’s life, being born an untouchable meant a lifetime of being trapped in a low income “dirty” job with very low social status. Marriages would only take place among caste members, and hence one’s children would be faced with the same hurdles brought by the untouchable identity, leading to systematic discrimination locked into place for generations.

It isn’t surprising that the Dalits consistently rank near the bottom of poverty statistics in an already poverty-ridden country. The term “poorest of the poor” would be an apt description of their socio-economic status in general. For decades, this made them the targets of several affirmative action programs as well as many a politician looking to champion a cause.



While affirmative action has helped some get ahead, it has by no means been a panacea. For as long as all industry was state-controlled and subject to extensive licensing, the state effectively made all production decisions and awarded licenses to a few chosen oligarchs. This meant that opportunities for entrepreneurship and business were slim to none, and affirmative action programs only served to redistribute pieces of a fixed pie from one to another.

Slumdog Millionaires

But there is a new heartwarming trend of entrepreneurship and self-help among Dalits since the liberal reforms in India, especially in urban areas. A visit to the Dalit Chamber of Commerce website (see also the Facebook page) reveals slogans such as “Fight Caste with Capital” and “Be Job givers, not Job seekers” as well as a spokesperson who favorably cites the invisible hand, a la Adam Smith! This voluntary Chamber of Commerce, set up in 2003 to bring Dalit entrepreneurs together, currently has 5,000 members whose enterprises jointly boast over half a billion dollars in sales revenue. The actual number of entrepreneurs in the population is much higher.

To what do they owe their success? Fascinating new qualitative research that tracks the life stories of several of these Dalit entrepreneurs reveals a common thread. The opening up of production processes to market forces created new opportunities like never before. Starting small and scraping together resources and capital, many of these Dalits now run business empires that actually provide employment to upper caste members.

There is Thomas Barnabas who was born into a family of bonded laborers, all eight of whom lived in a one-room house. Thomas recalls being thrown out of an upper caste friend’s home as a child after eating and drinking there because he was “untouchable.” They then proceeded to purify and wash the floor where he sat and threw away the dishes from which he ate.

Thomas now owns an industrial waste recycling and disposal business that has an annual sales revenue of $2.3 million and employs 200 people (including many upper caste members) outside the city of Chennai. He strove to fulfill an unmet demand for the processing of industrial waste generated by large corporations like Samsung, Dell, and Mercedes that set up manufacturing facilities in India after liberalization.

Market forces unwittingly brought about economic and thus social progress for society’s poorest and most discriminated against.

 

Or there is M.M. Rao, who was just one of two children to get an education in a family of bonded laborers with eight children. His family was so poor that they could not afford to buy shoes. His mother and sister were forced to walk barefoot to work in a nearby town.

Rao now owns a group of companies that specialize in construction, especially in the telecom sector, with a sales revenue of $7.4 million in 2010 alone. He was able to use his education as a civil engineer to start a small sub-contracting business laying telephone cables for large companies after the liberalization of the telecom sector. Owing to the quality of his work as well as his business acumen, he was able to grow that small sub-contracting business into what it is today.

Sushil Patil grew up in a 200 square foot house in a slum, and his father was a laborer in a factory where he was discriminated against for his low caste status. Sushil was able to complete his engineering degree only because his father had to request the college dean to waive the fees that they could not afford to pay. He recalls, “I can never forget my father bowing before the dean, that hit me hard.” He now owns a construction and engineering company with revenues of $45 million a year. His main business is to handle the construction of power plants for major power companies. He has friends who still live in the slum that he grew up in and hopes to construct a charitable hospital that will offer medical services free of charge to the poor.

Markets Break Down Barriers

These stories constitute but a tiny sliver of many thousands, if not more. They lead us to an interesting question: how is it exactly that markets fight social discrimination? Markets work in very different ways than the obvious and visible hand of state-driven policies. While the state seeks to outlaw and abolish caste identity by making discrimination illegal, markets work in quiet and invisible ways by making caste identity irrelevant.

Competition brings about the existence of meaningful and relevant alternatives that raise the opportunity cost of discrimination for everyone participating in the market. It is in an entrepreneur’s economic interest to hire and contract with those who have the highest marginal productivity regardless of their caste identity. For if he does not, his competitor might potentially steal away profits that he could have earned. The more open and competitive a market, the more true this holds.

Once liberal reforms were put in place, they created choice and opportunity for many like never before. Market forces unwittingly brought about economic and thus social progress for society’s poorest and most discriminated against.

But can we go as far as saying the caste system has withered away? Not at all. It is unfortunately alive and well, especially in the rural areas where 68% of the population still lives, despite its being legally “outlawed” for decades.

Can we say that discrimination melts away in a market setting? Not necessarily. Anyone is free to discriminate on the basis of caste identity, even in a market. However, the greater the economic opportunity out there, the greater the chance that the cost of discrimination will be borne by the discriminator himself, not the one being discriminated against.

It’s not a coincidence that there were no Dalit millionaires emerging under socialism.

This is not true under socialism. When the state has a monopoly over all production and its chosen oligarchs (employers) sell to a captive market, discriminating against a certain group of people does not have negative economic consequences for the employer, but only for the ones being discriminated against. Naysayers claim that this rise among Dalits is marginal and not representative of Dalits as a proportion to the total population of the country. Some are getting ahead, but most are still left behind.

While this may be true in terms of numbers, the fact that this has happened at all is nothing short of marvelous. It’s not a coincidence that there were no Dalit millionaires emerging under socialism. It is a direct consequence of the underlying institutional setting. The Dalits exemplify the theory of the so-called poverty trap: being locked into a low-income equilibrium for generations. And yet, given a little opportunity and choice, we see many leaving a life of poverty and social discrimination behind to become well-respected business leaders and philanthropists.

Most encouraging is the recognition among them that it is the invisible hand of the market that has been instrumental for social and economic progress in their community. It is a step in the right direction for the future of classical liberalism and its role in alleviating poverty at a time when many who are more fortunate seem to be forgetting or ignoring its importance.

References

  1. The unexpected rise of Dalit millionaires: Swaminathan Aiyar
  2. Capitalism is changing caste much faster than any human being: Shekhar Gupta
  3. Defying the odds: The Rise of Dalit Entrepreneurs: Devesh Kapur, D Shyam Babu, Chandra Bhan Prasad
  4. Capitalism’s Assault on the Indian caste system: Swaminathan Aiyar, Cato policy paper

5. Dalit Chamber of Commerce website: www.dicci.org

This essay originally appeared in FEE 

Clinton: US should use ‘military response’ to fight cyberattacks from Russia and China

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Clinton said the US should ‘lead the world in setting the rules in cyberspace’.

(IB TIMES) Hillary Clinton, the Democratic Party presidential nominee and former US secretary of state, has said that if she becomes president cyberattacks against US interests will be treated “like any other attack” – and that includes military action.


The candidate, who has been investigated by the FBI over use of a private email server to store classified material, was speaking on the campaign trial at the American Legion National Conference in Cincinnati, Ohio on 31 August.

“As President, I will make it clear that the United States will treat cyberattacks just like any other attack. We will be ready with serious political, economic, and military responses,” she told the attendees, largely made up of veterans and their supporters.

“We are going to invest in protecting our governmental networks and our national infrastructure,” she continued. “I want us to lead the world in setting the rules in cyberspace. If America doesn’t, others will.”



The speech made a number of references to the rise in cybercrime – and the various rival nation states that Clinton asserted are currently attacking the US. Most recently, Kremlin-linked hackers were suspected of hacking into the computer networks of the Democratic National Committee (DNC).

“We need to respond to evolving threats from states like Russia, China, Iran and North Korea,” Clinton said in the speech. “We need a military that is ready and agile so it can meet the full range of threats and operate on short notice across every domain – not just land, sea, air and space but also cyberspace.



“You’ve seen reports. Russia’s hacked into a lot of things, China has hacked into a lot of things. Russia even hacked into the Democratic National Committee, maybe even some state election systems. So we have got to step up our game. Make sure we are well defended and able to take the fight to those who go after us.”

As tensions between superpowers continues to escalate over cybercrime and cyber-espionage, US officials have remained uncertain about how to classify these security incidents – especially when a major computer infiltration crossed the line into an ‘act of war’.

During one recent US Department of Defense (DoD) strategy meeting, Aaron Hughes, deputy assistant secretary for cyber policy for the government, said: “Incidents described as cyberattacks or computer network attacks are not necessarily armed attacks for the purposes of triggering a nation-state’s inherent right of self-defence.

“When determining whether a cyber incident constitutes an armed attack, the US government considers a broad range of factors, including the nature and extent of injury or death to persons and the destruction of or damage to property,” he continued. “Cyber incidents are reviewed on a case-by-case basis […] and the national security leadership and the president will make a determination if it’s an ‘armed’ attack.”

However, following the recent DNC hack, US officials appeared to suggest there are loopholes to rules against ‘hacking back’ against adversaries by intelligence teams at the National Security Agency (NSA) when faced with serious threats.

“In terms of the foreign intelligence mission, one of the things we have to do is try to understand who did a breach, who is responsible for a breach,” Robert Joyce, chief of the NSA’s secretive ‘Tailored Access Operations’ told ABC News in a recent interview.

He noted the NSA does indeed have the “technical capabilities and legal authorities” to ‘hack back’ against suspected groups for intelligence gathering purposes. At the time of the report, three anonymous intelligence sources told ABC news such activities had already started.

The US government and the Obama administration have not yet pointed the finger directly at the Kremlin or the nation’s president Vladimir Putin. Yet in pre-election rhetoric, Clinton has remained adamant that Russian hackers were involved in the DNC attack.

“We know that Russian intelligence services, which are part of the Russian government, which is under the firm control of Vladimir Putin, hacked into the DNC. We know that they arranged for a lot of those emails to be released,” Clinton said in an interview with Fox News aired on 31 July. In response, the Russian government has repeatedly denied involvement in the breaches.

‘Like it’s been nuked’: Millions of bees dead after SC sprays for Zika mosquitoes

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On Sunday morning, the South Carolina honey bees began to die in massive numbers.

(WP) Death came suddenly to Dorchester County, S.C. Stressed insects tried to flee their nests, only to surrender in little clumps at hive entrances. The dead worker bees littering the farms suggested that colony collapse disorder was not the culprit — in that odd phenomenon, workers vanish as though raptured, leaving a living queen and young bees behind.



Instead, the dead heaps signaled the killer was less mysterious, but no less devastating. The pattern matched acute pesticide poisoning. By one estimate, at a single apiary — Flowertown Bee Farm and Supply, in Summerville — 46 hives died on the spot, totaling about 2.5 million bees.

Walking through the farm, one Summerville woman wrote on Facebook, was “like visiting a cemetery, pure sadness.”

A Clemson University scientist collected soil samples from Flowertown on Tuesday, according to WCBD-TV, to further investigate the cause of death. But to the bee farmers, the reason is already clear. Their bees had been poisoned by Dorchester’s own insecticide efforts, casualties in the war on disease-carrying mosquitoes.

On Sunday morning, parts of Dorchester County were sprayed with Naled, a common insecticide that kills mosquitoes on contact. The United States began using Naled in 1959, according to the Environmental Protection Agency, which notes that the chemical dissipates so quickly it is not a hazard to people. That said, human exposure to Naled during spraying “should not occur.”

In parts of South Carolina, trucks trailing pesticide clouds are not an unusual sight, thanks to a mosquito-control program that also includes destroying larvae. Given the current concerns of West Nile virus and Zika — there are several dozen cases of travel-related Zika in South Carolina, though the state health department reports no one has yet acquired the disease from a local mosquito bite — Dorchester decided to try something different Sunday.



It marked a departure from Dorchester County’s usual ground-based efforts. For the first time, an airplane dispensed Naled in a fine mist, raining insect death from above between 6:30 a.m. and 8:30 a.m. Sunday. The county says it provided plenty of warning, spreading word about the pesticide plane via a newspaper announcement Friday and a Facebook post Saturday.

Local beekeepers felt differently.

“Had I known, I would have been camping on the steps doing whatever I had to do screaming, ‘No you can’t do this,’” beekeeper Juanita Stanley said in an interview with Charleston’s WCSC-TV. Stanley told the Charleston Post and Courier that the bees are her income, but she is more devastated by the loss of the bees than her honey.

The county acknowledged the bee deaths Tuesday. “Dorchester County is aware that some beekeepers in the area that was sprayed on Sunday lost their beehives,” Jason Ward, county administrator, said in a news release. He added, according to the Charleston Post and Courier, “I am not pleased that so many bees were killed.”



Spraying Naled from the air is not unprecedented, particularly when covering areas that cannot be reached by truck. In a single year in Florida, more than 6 million acres were fumigated with the chemical, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The agency argued in January that the technique should be used to curb Zika in Puerto Rico.

But the insect neurotoxin cannot discriminate between honey bees and bloodsuckers. A profile of the chemical in Cornell University’s pesticide database warned that “Naled is highly toxic to bees.”

Although the insecticide was known to kill bees, to South Carolina beekeepers spraying had not been as significant a concern as parasites, disease and other hive threats. As South Carolina Beekeepers Association President Larry Haigh told the Post and Courier in June 2015, many counties will spray at night, when honey bees do not forage for pollen. Plus, given sufficient warning, beekeepers will shield their hives and protect the bees’ food and water from contamination.

Sunday was different. Summerville resident Andrew Macke, who keeps bees as a hobby, wrote on Facebook that the hot weather left bees particularly exposed. Once temperatures exceed 90 degrees, bees may exit the nest to cool down in what is called a beard, clustering on the outside of the hive in a ball. Neither Macke nor Stanley had covered their hives.

And then came the plane.

“They passed right over the trees three times,” Stanley said to ABC 4 News. After the plane left, the familiar buzzing stopped. The silence in its wake was like a morgue, she said.

As for the dead bees, as Stanley told the AP, her farm “looks like it’s been nuked.”

A Summerville resident started a Change.org petition calling for Dorchester County to halt aerial Naled spraying. It is unclear whether those who lost bees are pursuing other recourse.

The FBI Distributes Child Pornography to Catch People Who Look at It

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By its own logic, the government victimized children thousands of times.




(HIT & RUN) As part of a recent child pornography investigation disconcertingly known as Operation Pacifier, the FBI ran a website that distributed photographs and videos of sexual abuse. Last year, the Seattle Times reports, “after arresting the North Carolina administrator of The Playpen, a ‘dark web’ child-pornography internet bulletin board, agents seized the site’s server and moved it to an FBI warehouse in Virginia.” The FBI used the website to run “a sting and computer-hacking operation of unparalleled scope that has thus far led to criminal charges against 186 people,” mostly for receiving or possessing child pornography. In other words, the FBI became a major distributor of child pornography to catch people who look at it, thereby committing a more serious crime than the people it arrested.



Operation Pacifier is reminiscent of reverse drug stings in which cops pose as dealers to catch retail buyers, except that in this case the FBI actually disseminated contraband. It did not merely pose as a distributor of child pornography; it was a distributor of child pornography. During the two weeks the FBI was running The Playpen, about 100,000 people visited the site, accessing at least 48,000 photos, 200 videos, and 13,000 links. In fact, the FBI seems to have made The Playpen a lot more popular by making it faster and more accessible. The FBI’s version attracted some 50,000 visitors per week, up from 11,000 before the government takeover.

As attorneys representing the people busted by the FBI have pointed out, those actions are deeply problematic in light of the government’s position that children are revictimized every time images of their sexual abuse are viewed or transferred. That argument is one of the main rationales for punishing mere possession of child pornography, which under federal law and the laws of some states can be treated more harshly than violent crimes—more harshly even than actual abuse of children. That penalty structure is obviously irrational unless you believe that serious harm is inflicted every time someone looks at the image of a child’s sexual abuse. In that case, a large enough collection of images could equal or even surpass the harm done by a single child rape, so that it could make sense to impose a life sentence on someone who has done nothing but look at pictures.


Yeah, I don’t buy that either. But federal prosecutors supposedly do, and here they are bringing cases that, by their own lights, required the FBI to victimize children thousands of times. Each time the FBI “distributed” an image, it committed a federal crime that is punishable by a mandatory minimum sentence of five years and a maximum sentence of 20 years. So did the person who “received” the image, which in the Internet context is the same as looking at it. If such actions merit criminal punishment because they are inherently harmful, there is no logical reason why the agents who ran The Playpen should escape the penalties they want to impose on the people who visited the site.

In a 2002 New York University Law Review article, Howard Anglin argued that victims of child pornographers have legal grounds to sue FBI agents who mail images of them to targets of undercover investigations. “If, as courts have held, the children depicted in child pornography are victimized anew each time it changes hands, this practice inflicts further injuries on the children portrayed in the images,” Anglin wrote. “The practice of distributing child pornography in undercover operations exposes federal agents to potential civil liability and undermines the integrity of the criminal justice system.”

Officer of the Year Arrested for Domestic Abuse

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YORK, Pa. (AP) – A central Pennsylvania county’s “Police Officer of the Year” has been charged with assaulting his wife.



The York Dispatch reports 34-year-old Bryn Lindenmuth was charged with simple assault, false imprisonment and harassment for allegedly ripping off some of his wife’s clothes, scratching her and refusing to let her leave her home after she returned from a cookout Saturday night. West Manchester Township police say she was able to run to a neighbor’s and call 911.

Lindenmuth has been placed on paid leave by the Southwestern Regional Police, who patrol several of York’s suburbs. His defense attorney didn’t immediately return a call for comment Wednesday.

Lindenmuth was named York County’s officer of the year in 2015 for making 16 DUI arrests, filing 45 criminal charges and conducting 350 traffic stops.

After Bryn Lindenmuth was arrested, Kalina Lindenmuth said she was “sick and tired” of being physically abused and pushed around by her husband, saying this type of violence had happened many times before, documents state.



She said she was afraid to call authorities because her husband is a police officer, according to charging documents.

The incident: Kalina Lindenmuth returned home from a cookout about 10:45 p.m. Saturday, and was parked near her home. Bryn Lindenmuth drove by in his Jeep, got out, unlocked his wife’s car with spare keys and took her keys out of her car, according to documents.

Bryn Lindenmuth then yelled at Kalina Lindenmuth before heading off in his Jeep, documents state. Kalina Lindenmuth walked back to her home, where police say she found her husband throwing beer bottles on the front lawn.

When she went into the house, her husband continued to yell at her, taking her phone and looking through it, police said. Bryn Lindenmuth then allegedly ripped her tank top, ripped off her bra, scratched her and allegedly tore apart her sandals, documents state. He also allegedly ripped up photos of them together, police said.

Kalina Lindenmuth then sat on a recliner while Bryn Lindenmuth used her phone to call her sister, telling the sister to mind her own business and calling both women “pieces of sh—t,” according to police.

Police say Bryn Lindenmuth pushed over the recliner with his wife still in it and that when she tried to walk away, he blocked her and pushed her, then tried to throw her through the rear sliding-glass door.

Bryn Lindenmuth allegedly hoisted Kalina Lindenmuth over his shoulder, but she managed to get away and ran to get her phone. Bryn Lindenmuth got the phone first and put it in his pocket, police said, then picked her up again, trying to force her outside.

“Bryn used substantial force using his elbow and jammed it down hard on her shoulder in an attempt to knock her down,” documents state.



He then tried to lock Kalina Lindenmuth in the garage, telling her she could sleep there before turning off the lights, documents state. After that, Bryn Lindenmuth allegedly came into the garage, telling his wife they were leaving, and he tried to force her into the passenger seat of a vehicle.

Kalina Lindenmuth tried to get back into the home to get her phone and wallet, but “Bryn kept blocking her path and grabbed her arms and started to force her backward to possibly fall down the steps,” documents state.

Kalina Lindenmuth was able to grab her flip-flops and run to a neighbor’s home, where she used their phone to call 911, police said. The entirety of the incident lasted from about 11 p.m. until 3 a.m., according to police.

While speaking with police, Kalina Lindenmuth said she was scared of what her husband might do after she called police, adding that he has many weapons in the house, documents state. The couple’s two children were not present during the incident, police said.

The responding officer conferred with the York County District Attorney’s Office before filing the charges, police said, and Kalina Lindenmuth was taken to a local district judge’s office to obtain an emergency protection-from-abuse order.

Investigation: Southwestern Regional Police Chief Greg Bean confirmed Tuesday that Bryn Lindenmuth was placed on paid leave immediately after the alleged incident. Bean said Lindenmuth will remain on paid leave until an internal investigation is complete.

An investigator within the department will be assigned to speak with those involved to determine if there has been any violation of orders. That will then be presented to the police board, which will make a decision about any disciplinary action, he said.

“We don’t want any stone unturned, as far as the facts of the situation, and we present the information as we know it, and a determination is made at that point,” Bean said.

The department will be working closely with the York County District Attorney’s Office and West Manchester Township Police during the investigation, he said.

Accolades: Bryn Lindenmuth was named 2015 York County Officer of the Year in May by the York County Police Heritage Museum.

He has been with the department for 11 years, according to a news release announcing the award. During that time he has received 21 awards or commendations. In 2015, he made 16 DUI arrests, filed 45 criminal charges and conducted 350 traffic enforcement stops, the release states.

“From the perspective of a police officer, he’s always excelled at whatever he does,” Bean said.

Bryn Lindenmuth also is a drug recognition expert and a member of the York County Drug Task Force as a liaison for the department, according to the release.

Lindenmuth could not be reached for comment Wednesday and remains free on $25,000 unsecured bail, meaning he didn’t have to post any money but could lose that amount if he fails to attend court proceedings.

Defense attorney Chris Ferro did not return a message seeking comment on Wednesday afternoon.

HT to GT for reporting on the story

Justice Dept.: “Half of Sexual Abuse Claims in American Prisons Involve Guards”

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Allegations of sex abuse across the country’s prisons are on the rise, with nearly half of cases allegedly being perpetrated by guards, according to a new study conducted by the Justice Department.



(GS) The new Bureau of Justice Statistics report documented more than 8,763 allegations of prisoner sexual victimization between 2009 and 2011, which they say is an 11 percent increase over the number of allegations documented in a report covering 2007-08.

The study found 49 percent of the unwanted sexual misconduct or harassment involved prison staff as perpetrators, in acts ranging from verbal sexual harassment to the most serious nonconsensual sexual penetration.

Allen Beck, a Justice Department statistician and the study’s co-author told ABC News the increased reporting may not necessarily a reflection of an actual increase in the incidence of sexual victimization, but could in part be attributed to the Prison Rape Elimination Act (2003), which is being implemented across the country after final regulations for the act were issued in May 2012.



“It’s reasonable to believe that some of the increase may be related to the greater attention being paid to the issues as well as the better recording and reporting procedures to us,” Beck said.

The Act forces prisons to comply with standards geared toward reducing the incidence of rape and sexual victimization, a key component being the provision of multiple channels for inmates to report abuse, including the option to contact an outside entity. Facilities will also be audited for compliance with the legislation.

Previously, finding the appropriate channels to report abuse could be considered more daunting for inmates, especially if they had to be made intra-institutionally to someone working within the prison’s chain of command.

Bradley W. Brockmann, executive director of The Center for Prisoner Health and Human Rights at Brown University told ABC News that although the study showed there was a rise in the number of reports of sexual abuse, those cases represented a minute fraction of the “extraordinary sexual victimization that goes on daily.”

“The biggest challenge here is that prisons are closed doors,” said Brockmann, who is also a civil rights attorney. “What happens behind those walls generally stays behind them. For somebody to speak out takes immense courage.”

Brockmann said that often when prisoners do speak out, they fear retaliation from the correctional officers.

“Ultimately unless there are witnesses — which is rare — it’s going to come down to the word of the prisoner versus officer,” he said.

This aligns with the study’s findings, which revealed that only 10 percent of sexual abuse claims were investigated and substantiated by officials, the rest being dismissed as “unfounded” or “unsubstantiated.”

Of those substantiated cases, 84 percent of female staff-on-inmate sexual contact “appeared to be willing,” compared with 37 percent of cases allegedly perpetrated by male staff, despite clear laws prohibiting any form of sexual contact between inmates and staff.

Brockmann, attributes some of those numbers to “the extraordinary vulnerability of particularly female prisoners, a disproportionate number of whom have also been victims of sexual, emotional physical abuse since childhood.

“It doesn’t take a lot of coercion to result in what might appear to be consensual act, even though no sex behind bars between staff and inmate can be consensual,” he said.

Of the fewer cases in which the sexual abuse claims against correctional officers were found to be substantiated, more than three-quarters of those officers were fired or resigned, while 45 percent were referred for prosecution and only 1 percent were actually convicted of a crime.



The survey did not break down figures between inmates of different sexual orientations, although Beck said that previous surveys on non-heterosexual and gender nonconforming inmates had revealed much higher rates of sexual victimization.

The study comes the same week as reports of a Justice Department investigation into allegations of rampant sexual abuse at Alabama’s Tutwiler Prison, where inmates were said to “universally fear for their safety” and officers allegedly forced women to engage in sex acts just to obtain basic sanitary supplies.

Brockmann said that shedding light upon and reducing sexual abuse and harassment in prisons like these remains a challenge across the country.

“We know there are hundreds of thousands of more cases out there,” he said.

“That slight increase in reporting I hope is a harbinger of things to come, that there are more individuals who feel safe or more mechanisms to report abuse and avoid retaliation.

“What will make a difference is when we see a few tens of thousands of cases reported,” he said. “That will show something.”

The reports, Sexual Victimization Reported by Adult Correctional Authorities, 2009?11 (NCJ 243904), and Survey of Sexual Violence in Adult Correctional Facilities, 2009?11 – Statistical Tables (NCJ 244227), were written by Allen J. Beck, Ramona R. Rantala and Jessica Rexroat of BJS.

The reports, related documents and additional information about BJS’s statistical publications and programs can be found on the BJS website.